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, "iron curtain: the crushing of eastern europe, 1944-1956." >> why do you open with a quote from churchill? >> heat. the expression -- he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative description of what happened when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- baltimore, berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first spoke -- book, and while this is in no way a sequel
crushing of eastern europe, 1944-1956." >> why do you open with a quote from churchill? >> he coined the expression iron curtain. it was such an evocative escription of what happened, when he gave the speech that i thought it was important to put that the beginning of the book. >> did you ever think of what he called that the iron curtain? >> there is a long story. it is a theatrical term. there was an iron curtain theaters used to use to prevent fires. churchill used it first in private. >> you know why? >> it was a favor for truman. that is where truman was from. >> let's get a slice of that speech. >> an iron curtain has descended across the continent. behind that line, like all the capitals of the ancient states of central and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the questi
and eastern europe -- berlin, prague, vienna, budapest, belgrade, bucharest. all of these famous cities and the population around them lying in rubble -- lie under the soviet sphere. >> why did you want to talk about this? >> i was inspired in my first book, and while this is in no way a sequel it represents thoughts i had. one thing i got interested in is the question why no people went along with it. what is the mentality? what are institutional pressures? why do camp guard do what they are told to do? i decided to write about this period right after world war ii, because it was a time the soviet union had reached a height, there was an apotheosis of stalinism. it was reinforced by the experience of the war. by 1945, it was a fully developed system with an economic theory and a clear ideology, and it was at this moment the red army marched into central europe and began imposing that system on the central european states, so you can see how from scratch -- what did the soviets think their system was? what did they think was important, and how did they try to carry it out? >> where did
eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is from some land. europe is now divided in many ways to -. there are a few elements of the communist past you can see. there is a paranoid element in politics that comes from the legacy of people being spied on and having lived in an oppressive system. they are more paranoid about secret deals behind their backs, because secret deals were done behind their backs, and that is understandable. there is an anxiety about being left behind in the west. the memory of the past continues to play out, but in truth, these countries are more different from one another than they are similar. >> you through -- you chose three of eight countries behind the iron curtain? >> it depends on how you count. >> what were the three democrats i chose to poland, hungary, and east germany. they have different histori
and spain. >> how different is it outside of europe in the wider arab world, the middle east? >> they are more accepted outside of europe because europe is a shocking and islamic bloc because there's a need to find a european identity, especially now in the crisis. >> where do you see this going? do you see the creation of a broader european islamic bloc? >> islam house oe been adapted to its cultural surroundings and we can see european islam coming up in a lot of centers in europe. >> his specialist in the dialogue between the islamic world and the west, thank you. onto soccer now. dortmund with another victory under their belts helping the reigning champions close in on the league leaders. their season has been punctuated by ups and downs, but on sunday and, they notched up another important victory in their title defense. >> warring on from the touch line, the caretaker urging his to stay compact. breached by mario. still, he did not play. fearing relegation. moments later, sven scoring a deserved equalizer. in the second half, again with the breakthrough gift. and the ea
morning. all right. coming up new at 10, germany's chancellor angela merkel says europe will have to work very hard to it maintain its current standard of living. at the top of the hour, find out what she's saying about welfare and here is another development from overseas. we brought you the story last week, french actor gerard depardu, he is leaving home, leaving france because of higher taxes and handed in his passport. now, the french prime minister has some choice words for mr. depardu. he's obviously in the happy with him and find out exactly what he said at ten o'clock eastern time this morning. time is money. 30 seconds, here is what else we've got for you, an in japan, again, a landslide win, so, what's the new prime minister going to do about the world's worst debt problem? print more money and stimulate more, too. build more infrastructure. will that work? we have our own resident japan expert. question, is jeff immelt's cozy relationship with the president costing general electric shareholders money? we will be discussing it. and i lost on friday when i questioned "the washing
states, 7% china, 5% india, negative one in europe. in that environment you want to own a portfolio of multinational companies with dividends, global exposure, it will provide as good of a return as anything else when you have bonds and cash paying so low. as long as you understand you're in the seven, 8% environment, portfolio stocks should be part of that. david: let's talk to a guy that says full speed ahead torpedoes. he thinks it will be better than this year was. saying people are confusing pickups for heart attacks in today's market to all these problems are going to seem like nothing when we come to the big gains of next year. you really think that will bear out, and how do you invest with that kinddof optimistic strategy? >> first of all what we have seen with investor sentiment is contradictory to what we've seen with consumer sentiment and business sentiment. when you see negative investor sentiment is not just in the retail side but also the institutional side creating a great potential opportunity for performance. secondly if you take a look at kicking the can down the
. >>> and corporate news weighs on sentiment across europe. kpn shares fall after dividend and greco stocks plunges as analysts cut their outlook for the uk power group. >> okay. welcome. it's the start of a brand new week here on "worldwide exchange." and don't adjust your set, kelly and i are together. >> for once, for a day. >> but make the most of it because it won't be lasting. >> if only there were a slo-mo. >> i'm going to enjoy as much as i can of today. >> and likewise. and then we're going to have to get all of our u.s. voouers to find cnbc world because they could get three hours of you, carol and carolin for the rest of the week. >> whatever they can do. record it and fast forward to the good bits. >> yeah. >> it will be 2:00, 3:00 in the morning or whatever. >>> on today's show, plenty to come on. >> yes. the south american union faces ejection from the imf for allegedly cooking its books about the innation rate. we'll head out to europe where the swiss banking giants could be facing $1.6 billion over libor rate rigging allegations. >> and we'll be on the floor in beijing where china's
prefer to expand in asia than here, or even europe that i talk to. the banner to be found in america, natural gas and all that stuff, i can think of just three companies taking advantage of it. and that's talking about exporting it. the partnership sign. a 20-year agreement with total today, cqp is the symbol there. the real problem is in the exporting of the cheaper, cleaner fuel that is natural gas. not burning it here. or manufacturing with it. the industrial renaissance as i've been telling you, as much as it just breaks my heart, is stillborn. it's not getting better. retail's a real worry. i think we've fallen off a gift cliff. so few companies i know are doing well this holiday season. it is looking like a total bust. courtesy of sandy, incredibly warm weather and, of course, the fear engendered by the serious issue that is the fiscal cliff. i see that weakness and i'm not crazy about these stocks, in general. but i think that the conclusion of the housing crisis is upon us. which means there will be more money going to building and fixing up homes in 2013 than there was in 20
company held. they been thought through the rest of europe. and as they fought through europe, the next place they were at was a place called brett. there was a coastal fort, a major port. allies needed to resupply their forces. they needed a harbor. the only problem was there was another gun position. and like pointe du hoc, it was a suicide mission. something called the locust battery. the locust battery had massive battleship sized guns that were buried mostly the entire fortress buried underground. picture a four-story building, fortress, that had been buried underground. there were elevators going down this thing. .. >> the men described to me how the shells came over like freight trains. the shells could destroy an spire hedge row, a small mound of earth, and bury men alive. and that's exactly what happened. they fought for several weeks many this place -- in this place x then what's amazing is a small team of four men led by lieutenant bob evland, they were known as the fabulous father. the fabulous four found a bunker and a small path that had been worn out. it looked like it ha
, businesses started cutting back aggressively. and i think that was partly because of concern over europe. conference over china. businesses are running very, very clean right now. i do think there's capacity. >> and maybe that business investment will help the consumer who will feel the pinch of higher taxes? >> that's the hope ultimately is that you get that multiplier. businesses and corporations have been doing well, they have cash on the balance sheets and they start lending. i think one of the other crucial components is credit creation. it can't just come from large corporations. it has to come from medium and small bess. >>> coming up, bob doll gives us his outlook for the fed. linking rates to the unemployment rate. then at 8:00 eastern, a cnbc exclusive, david tepper, one of the world's top performing hedge fund managers will give us some of his investing wisdom and what will be a can't miss "squawk box" interview coming right back. [ penélope ] i found the best cafe in the world. nespresso. where i never have to compromise on anything. ♪ where just one touch creates the perf
right after the open. as for the action in europe, taking its cues from the united states. we'll see a big rally in china extending one of its biggest rallies in three years. we have a mixed bag in europe with italy up by about .2 of 1%. >> we'll do our best to keep focused on the business day. we'll be following the tragic shooting in connecticut, of course. the new york stock exchange will hold a moment of silence to honor the victims in the next few moments, and we'll be looking at the president's call for meaningful action and the politics of gun control. >> let's get to a road map for this morning. it starts with apple. under pressure once again. even dipping below $500 a share at some point this morning. shares will remain range bound near term. iphone 5 sales and cannibalization among the region. >> other concessions from the gop, the speaker proposing tax hikes for millionaires. could this be the tipping point. moving the talks beyond deadlock. >> a big week for earnings. yes, earnings. fedex, research in motion among the companies reporting. so finally maybe we'll be talking
is going to be, fiscal cliff going into the end of the year, we'll start to focus on europe and japan printing money over there. we'll get back into the macroeconomic horizons and see how it goes. but yeah. i think there's been some outflows in certain sectors, risk is on here. >> all right. bill nichols how are you playing this waiting game right now? >> i think one of the real interesting sectors one of the guests mentioned is the action in financials. you look at bank america and you haven't seen any real participation in the financial sector for four or five years. that's one to keep an eye on. you may see a meaningful move. that could be good for the market. >> you don't think it's too late -- >> -- next year in terms of a tax increase. >> bank of america is the best performing this year. it's not too late to get into that? you think there's more to come? >> look at the short-term move and it looks good. look at a five or six year chart and it's a different story. looks like you've got more room on the upside. >> rick santelli, jump in here. what are you seeing in chicago the mov
are ongoing in the interior areas of the balkan peninsula down toward eastern europe. but still on the dry side up into northwestern russia due to a low pressure system, i should say. high pressure system stretching from siberia. very chilly, minus 14 degrees is your expected high on your monday. minus 9 degrees in kiev. cooler than average temperatures will continue into your friday here. less than 10 degrees in paris and 13 degrees in madrid on your monday. here's your extended forecast. >>> and we leave you with our top story at this hour. a party that has dominated japanese politics for decades is set to return to power. the liberal democrats have won a strong new man date in the election for the lower house. the liberal democrats have worked together for years with their partners in new komeito. the ldp has won 294 seats, new komeito 31. ldp's leader is taking the seat he has held since 2007. all those seats will allow the liberal democrats to push through their policies. the election sent the ruling democrats tumbling out of power. the dpj has 230 seats heading into the vote. they he
in all over north america and europe and africa and really we have got wishes coming in from almost every country in the world now. and people are just expressing, all kinds of amazing hopes and dreams for the future of the world which is really encouraging for us. we create the tree as a symbol of the global unity and hope. and we are going to continue to add wishes to the tree all through the month of december. so we would love for you to go to our website which is rainbow fund.org and it is free and we will printout your wish on a piece of paper and fold it into a crane and put it up on the tree. now, i want to thank, some key people who helped with this year's tree. first i want to start off with our core team, our core creative team and that consists of karin kai and linda mihara and thank you they have been working on the tree for seven years. >> and this year we have the help of dozens of volunteers and i want to particularly acknowledge the university of berkeley alfa, fi omega service community and volunteers from one brick. aid for good, the san francisco chapter. and you guys a
honorable friend goes to a summit tomorrow. has he noted the federalization of europe? the parliament and only it is insuring democratic for the you? does he agree with this? >> i do agree with my honorable friend on this one. it is the national parliament that provides the real democratic legitimacy within the european union when we are discussing a banking union, it is to this house that represents our task appears that we should account. i bear that in mind when i am negotiating. >> can the prime minister confirm the statement reveals the government is now borrowing 212 billion pounds more than it previously planned to? >> i would take this with her plans were not to borrow even more. he was desperately disappointed it was predicted orlin would come down this year. that is a fact. >> the prime minister has rightly said we are locked in a global economic race. does he share my concern that having the highest aviation taxes in the world makes it harder for a business to compete and he increases the cost of living? let me ask the treasury to conduct a full review of whether it costs m
work week. now as we look towards europe into the british aisles, also watching a system move away into low country here. that's going to bring rain and snow. british isles clearing out on tuesday. the next system is going to pull in near wednesday. it will be the next big rain maker for you. definitely want to bring an umbrella with you. meanwhile, into greece and italy though, thunderstorm activity firing up across this area. it will start to pull off to the east. for the time being, continued to linger. the storms continue to fire up. as far as temperatures into the east, moscow, minus 14 for your high. further to west berlin, 4. a mild 8 and 9 in london and paris. here's a look at your extended forecast. >>> and that concludes this edition of "newsline." i'm keikichi hanada. we'll be back at the top of the hour. thank you for joining us on nhk world. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com
people left france for tax reasons. within europe, which is meant to be united, you have big tax competition within countries. to attracting wealthy people in belgium. the same can apply to great britain which tries to attract the very rich people. at the same time, they're cutting the deficits and taxing. public spending in france's biggest, but it is one reason why household consumption is down and why we have a recession. you have to take all of that into account. depardieu is complaining about different tax system that has subsidized the french film industry which has made him wealthy and successful. >> a good point. jock, good point. -- jacques, good point. two nasa spacecraft will crash into the service of the moon. it is the planned end to the mission to look at the gravitational field. >> the moon as it has never been seen before. the images making up this video were taken by the space laboratories. the size of a small washing machine, they started mapping the gravitational field in tandem. they think the moon has a shallow or cross than expected, the result of asteroids
the intellectual life and breakthroughs of the enlightenment in europe and scotland and apply them in many ways to american politics. self-government was only going to work in jefferson's mind if the people who were governing themselves knew themselves, cared about each other because why would you sacrifice with someone for whom you had no common interest, and you could find that your individual rights and your individual being had come from nature or god and therefore couldn't be taking away from the hand of a king or the hands of a mob in the this is the moment that he embodies. its hierarchical moment to be alive in that very hour, a hugely important so here you have jefferson who could kill a fly when he needs to and who could think of the most fundamental way when he needs to. one hell of a combination. what i wanted to do in revisiting jefferson obviously was try to restore him to his context as a politician partly because i think politics gets too bad of a wrap these days. it may deserve a city bad rap but i don't want to be overly optimistic. we don't have any other way to govern oursel
borrowing like this or we will have the same problems that europe is having. that is one of the frustrating things. they are not theoretical. that's not a classroom exercise. you can look at europe and see what happens if we continue down this path very much longer. >> alex rid man bill clinton's budget director put the bulk of the spending problems on the promises to medicare medicaid and lesser extent social security. >> they will drive federal spending occupy faster nan our economy can grow. revenues won't keep up. we have a problem. if you don't have enough revenues to pay for the spending you have to borrow. on the track that we are on if we go on doing what is in the law over the next several decades, our public debt will rise fast you are than our economy will grow. when that happens you have real problem. you have to pay interest on that debt and creditors see that your debt is rising faster than your economy is growing so they charge more and more. it is a very bad situation. >> arthur brooks with the american enterprise institute finds sur rent debates about higher taxes misguided
or pertain to europe or all of it? >> it pertains it a variety of things. first of all, ingenuity of u.s. corporations is outstanding. they got lean, mean and made money. profit margins went it a record high. now they are under pressure. so i'm not sure if we can keep that same level of high level profit margins. i think have you wild cards in europe and certainly we are very reminiscent of the debt ceiling fiasco we saw last year. >> yes, yes. all right, thank you, arthur. dear friend. >> my pleasure. >>> now to brian with the market flash. bri some. >> shares of aig up about 3%. their asian interest aia, basically going to get about 6 billion plus in terms of net on that deal so they will be out of that position. if you put into account, being out of their commit many to the u.s. government now putting cash in the bank to the tune of 6 to $6.5 billion, aig continues to look stronger every single day. up about 50% year to date. back to you. >> thank pup next half hour. bonds, are they in a bubble ready to burst? many thought it would happen this year, and they were wrong. we will disc
running this experiment in europe where they've implemented austerity in a number of countries with the idea that we're going to reduce government spending in order to reduce deficits, because we want to get the ratio of debt to g.d.p. to the size of the economy down. but what happens when they've done that is even though they may have shrunken the numerical value of the debt, the economy has contracted so much more that the debt to g.d.p. ratios get worse. it actually makes the problem worse. so, austerity is bad medicine now. >> i just read the other day that this campaign "fix the debt" raised $60 million and hired and it recruited 80 corporate ceos to go to washington and lobby for fixing the debt. what do they want? >> i think reason why the corporate executives are so big on fixing the debt is because they know that if they don't -- when they have some control over the political system through their political action committees and republican control of congress, they can't cut entitlements now. when they do eventually become a problem that will require some immediate acti
be causing a slow and steady demasculinizing of men. and in 2009, congress followed europe's lead and banned certain phthalates for use in children's toys. congress came under pressure to act because of a study by dr. shanna swan, an epidemiologist at the university of rochester medical school. dr. swan compared the levels of phthalates in a group of pregnant women with the health of the baby boys they gave birth to. did you find that the higher the level of phthalates in the mother's urine during pregnancy, the greater the problems in the young boys? >> yes. >> what did you find in the babies? >> we found that the baby boys were, in several subtle ways, less completely masculine. >> dr. howard snyder, a pediatric urologist at children's hospital in philadelphia, says swan's findings line up with what he's seeing in newborn baby boys-- an alarming increase in deformed sex organs. >> lie him down, and let me just examine him. >> dr. snyder operated on one-year-old griffin to correct something called hypospadias, a birth defect that causes problems in urination. but he's good now, right? >> he
't get that says our next guest on "wall street journal" reporter who reports on in europe and their work rules. from london, what do they get that we don't? >> european workers have the right to and protection of gainful unemployment. the minimum guaranteed staycation is 20 days paid not including weekend, additional time off , holidays. at france it starts at 25 per good european court of justice added on another to give a workers the right to to a vacation to over or give back. >> for instance it used the for two weeks for your christmas holiday and use brain drain gold and the last eight-- you are laid up that means they automatically go into your sickly youth then you could have the vacation do over to make up for those days that you weren't that sec or hurt. john: if you say i have they cold? they have to give you that back? >> if it is dead doctor's note to to say she got the sniffles so she will need another seven days of paid vacation. john: italy first. if you start a business and keep it small, up that 10 workers yo have some flexibility but number 11 1/2 to have the self asses
.s. that doesn't include those sophisticated geeky guys over in eastern europe in a boiler room during that. > if this is a case of neighbor-against-neighbor or family member-against-family member, what can people do to protect themselves? > > some of the stuff that we always talk about, and that is that you have to shred everything, because now you really know, your neighbors are going into your garbage and picking out stuff. so, shred everything. everything you have, no matter if it has any other identification about you besides your name and address. also, you have to guard your social security number, because that is what most of this id fraud is based on. it is really important to make sure you don't give it out to anyone, of course. give it out only to the people you need to, which is your job, your insurance company... don't give it out at a medical facility, for example. if you go to the doctor and they are asking you for it, don't give it to them. tell them your insurance company has it. because we have seen some theft come out of there as well. > that sounds like a great plan. tha
. nowhere in europe had he experienced that. this technology was doing something to support the life and the growth of the city. philadelphia, throughout the 19th century, was the major industrial city of the united states. all of these industries used water from this system. and it served as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of
the strongest in europe and it's the -- it basically is a policy that pays the homeowners so it makes investing in solar attractive to homeowners. right now it's not attractive to put a hundred solar panels on your roof, but under this policy germany has made tremendous advances. there is one country in the world that is 100% solar power as of last month. cca cannot possibly do what they need done. the word -- you can boil this whole argument down to one question, one word and that is "inevitability". we are running out of the oil. we are drowning in our own waste. we need to stop burning oil and the way you could do it is putting a couple hundred solar panels on each house in san francisco. this was indirectly mentioned in the guardian editorial but they don't say it and it's because they don't understand it. it's important to understand what being done in germany and other countries around the world because by doing this they're creating a massive cash flow to homeowners in these countries and it's an investment that the homeowners are glad to take the money out of equity and buy pane
, we are eating lessio gurt here in america than most of the europe and even canada. sometimes less. this nutrition, pure simplio gurt has been around for hundreds and hundreds of years but somehow is lacking from the diet of americans. and with chobani really people get a chance to taste realio gurt. and i think they are getting more exciting and we believe in the next three, four years as long as we make awesomio gurt, more people will eat and there is room for everybody. >> susie: you know, you introduced a couple of new snack products from yhobani, the flip, the bite, the tube. what kind of sales are you expecting from this next year? >> we are expecting to go way beyond billion. we have reached close to a billion dollars with our one plant. but i think this growth is going to be same growth as we are asking. we don't put the numbers in place. but we're looking we can double our business in the next couple of years. >> susie: you know, i'm here at the new york stock exchange. how much long certificate it going to be before chobani stock is trading here? >> you know, when we star
real changes and progress. >> europe in her state building shooting or a man killed another man in front of the empire state building months ago. nine people were injured near the empire state building. all of them were injured by police when they unloaded 16 rounds in the shadow of the empire state building after a disgruntled former apparel designer, killing at to engage in a gunbattle with police. paul barrett, and coulter said, only one policy is ever been tried to deter mass murder -- concealed carry laws. >> i don't know what she means by only one policy has been shown. i don't know what social science she is pointing to. the hard truth for people on both sides of this debate is the social science is inconclusive. the best studies that have been done on the proliferation of separatearry laws image anyone who wants to conceal-carry license can have one. the best research has been done at yale university that says, quite candidly, we can not tell. we cannot find a good association between the liberalization of those laws, the fact it is easier to carry guns concealed a publi
that made our world a smaller place. we supported the marshall plan that helped europe regain its strength. and pioneered the atm, so you can get cash when you want it. it's been our privilege to back ideas like these, and the leaders behind them. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping people and their ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. >>> a toast to today's market close. where was the credit card prototype before it was sold at the sutherbys auction last week? the owner kept the card in his wallet since the 1960s. >>> welcome back. the hobble school shooting in connecticut is spurring action from washington lawmakers today. >> hello.
they are facing a similar probe in europe. >>> stock market has been focused on "fiscal cliff" talks of late. negative sentiment last week, some hope after some weekend talks. so let's see how the market is doing now. dow higher by 52 points. nasdaq is up by 14. s&p gaining 7. apple shares flat, google up 1.5% on the "wall street journal" report. back to you. >> thank you, jason brooks with kcbs and cbsmoneywatch.com. >>> well, if you can avoid the post office today, you may want to. expect long lines there. it's going to be the busiest mailing day of the year with a crush of holiday packages. there will be a 20% increase in package deliveries compared to last year. that could help the struggling service recover from the recent billion-dollar losses. >>> it's time now for a look at what's coming up later on "cbs this morning." norah o'donnell is in newtown, connecticut. >> reporter: good morning, brian, elizabeth. it is a tough morning here in newtown with the first of the funerals beginning today. but we're also hearing some remarkable stories of bravery and heroism. ahead gayle king talks
centuries ago when europe was coming out of the dark ages. it was a period of humanism when the world-- and, in particular, the catholic church-- was open to new ideas in philosophy, science and individual liberty; a celebration of the human spirit. it's the pope's library, but it contains much more than church documents-- manuscripts going back nearly 2,000 on music, math and exploration; even cookbooks and love letters. a place for scholars only, but a place we can only hope can inspire an end to barbarism. welcome to the 15th century. in rome, turn a corner and you bump into antiquity, a delicious mixed salad of present and past. we arrived at the vatican to find a medieval costume parade in progress. what better way to begin a trek through history? >> timothy janz: there's about two million printed books. >> safer: two million printed books. and inside the library, the past surrounded us again, as we were shown the magnificent building and its riches. >> janz: this is the urbino bible. >> safer: for instance, this spectacular bible, commissioned in 1476 by the duke of urbino... >> janz:
of immigrants. it is not europe, it is not asia. it is not africa. but it is a common action of all. the rest of us are foreigners. sometimes we forget that. >> what dc is a potential solution? >> i think those of us that get old they can demonstrate what the nonpartisanship could result in. those that serve on our committees get the message. >> with your committee and relationship with ted stevens is the politics have changed over the years and the democrats are in control, and never seems to make that much of a difference on your committee as far as the ability to produce great results. >> [inaudible] if you go in that state and say nasty things about him, he won't forget it. >> our final question is the latest the question. over and above the things you have accomplished, or have yet to accomplish, how would you like to be remembered? >> this may sound foolish, but i just want people to know that i tried my best. >> senator, thank you very much. >> this program with senator inouye took place in 2008. he died earlier today at the age of 88 after serving since 1963 in the u.s. senate. he was
's watching some of them. nicole: i was going to volunteer for the wine tasting, send me to europe, i will do that. let's take a look at the movers, cheryl and dennis. we have followed apple so closely today because we are watching whether or not it would break below the $500 mark but it is a volatile stock. citigroup still likes apple but they reduc reduced the price tat today. the iphone 5 had record sales this weekend over in china. up 1%. googlgoogle up about 2% today. when we continue to watch after they got an upgrade. and jetblue, pulled up jetblue even though they raised several names in the airline sector including lcc, delta. united continental continental,e all fine. jetblue they raised to a hold, yet the one that is moving the most. up three and a quarter percent. dennis: records december opening for "the hobbit." which means the box office ahead. cheryl: jeff flock takes a look at how the fiscal cliff is threatening one business. >> the businesses that fix your cars, bake your bread, do all the other stuff in life. is fixing the fiscal cliff easier than fixing an automotive tran
. all the armies of europe and asia could not by force take a drink from the ohio river or make a track on the blue ridge in the trial of a thousand years. no, if destruction be our lot, we must ourselves be its author and its finisher. as a nation of free men, we will live forever or die by suicide." for the sake of my four children and yours, i choose life, and i choose change. it's time to turn over the tables inside the temple. and for the sake of our children, we must do what's right. and for the sake of this great nation that we love, let's pray to god that we do. >>> and coming up, we have connecticut senator richard blumenthal who will join us. he swent 30 years working in law enforcement in connecticut before he joined the u.s. senate. he is also a father of four, like joe. he joins us this morning with his unique perspective on the events in newtown. also ahead this morning, we'll hear from some of the teachers who were inside sandy hook elementary school when the shooting began. we'll also bring in mike barnicle, jon meacham and willie geist who spent part of the weekend in n
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